Coinciding with the International Society for Stem Cell Science (ISSCR) meeting in Melbourne, our Jeremy Sugarman along with Douglas Sipp and Megan Munsie take the opportunity, at 20 years since the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells, to comment on the ethical tensions now taking center stage

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Scientists are hopeful they can inject the gene-editing technology directly into the ear to stop hereditary deafness

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Research university leaders see wake-up call in data on sharp partisan divide on higher education, and deep cuts proposed by Trump

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Major investment in regenerative medicine enters its last stage — and the money might run out before treatments are ready

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Fetal lambs lived for weeks in a fluid-filled bag. Tests to help premature babies could begin in three years

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In 2001, President George W. Bush issued an executive order banning federal funding for new sources of stem cells developed from preimplantation human embryos. The action stalled research and discouraged scientists. Five years later, a Kyoto University scientist, Shinya Yamanaka, and his graduate student, Kazutoshi Takahashi, re-energized the field by devising a technique to “reprogram” any adult cell

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Deals continue to be signed for gene-editing tool called Crispr-Cas9

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It’s been a weird day for weird science. Not long after researchers claimed victory in performing a head transplant on a monkey, the US military’s blue-sky R&D agency announced a completely insane plan to build a chip that would enable the human brain to communicate directly with computers. What is this weird, surreal future?

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