What would happen if it actually works?

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A disgraced stem cell scientist is facing preliminary charges of involuntary manslaughter in connection with two patients who died after windpipe transplants, Swedish prosecutors said Wednesday

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Six years ago, Wang Huanming was paralyzed from the neck down after being injured wrestling with a friend. Today, he hopes he has found the answer to walking again: a new body for his head

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Inside a North Carolina lab, row upon row of plastic bioreactor bags pulsate gently to the beat of an artificial heart. Within each bag, a lab-forged blood vessel slowly expands, feeding off a primordial cocktail of vitamins and proteins

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But the procedure remains highly controversial. Critics worry about the risks it poses to women who are desperate to have children. “I don’t think you can find people more vulnerable than those who wish to become parents and can’t,” says Michelle Goodwin, a bioethicist at the University of California, Irvine

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The NIH should get on board. Hank Greely writes in an op-ed, ” Thirty years ago Paul Simon immortalized one of the first animal-human transplants with the lyrics, “These are the days of miracle and wonder.… Medicine is magical and magical is art. Thinking of the boy in the bubble and the baby with the baboon heart.”

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The first U.S. liver and kidney transplants from a donor with HIV were completed at Johns Hopkins Medicine

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Anonymous Doctor, “I won’t forget the palpable emotion on the ward. Organ donation is not commonplace but can change the lives of so many”

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