Jessica Porten went to a women’s clinic in Sacramento, CA that accepts her Medicaid coverage, to talk about medication options and therapy. Porten admitted to the nurse that she was having some violent thoughts. “I described maybe hitting myself or squeezing the baby too tight,” she said. “But I was very adamant through the entire appointment that I was not going to hurt myself and I was not going to hurt my children.”

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Midday’s Tom Hall talks with Dr. Jeffrey Kahn about clinical trials and diversity. Why is so much medical research still done with white subjects — and more often with men rather than women — and what are the consequences of that, particularly for women and people of color?

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A soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who’s paying for science?

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There is no question that the Tuskegee study is one of the most horrific examples of unethical research in recent history. For 40 years, ending in 1972, members of the United States Public Health Service followed African-American men infected with syphilis and didn’t treat them (although they told some men they did) so that they could see the disease take its course

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(Video) PBS Newshour special correspondent Sarah Varney reports on efforts to repair the relationship between Baltimore hospitals and black communities, as part of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News

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Reporters from Kaiser Health News and the University of Maryland’s Merrill College of Journalism spent much of the fall in and around Sandtown-Winchester, a Baltimore neighborhood where violence flared last year after Freddie Gray was fatally injured in police custody. Residents say they have little more confidence in the medical system intended to heal them than in the criminal justice system intended to protect them.

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Why African-Americans don’t use hospice. Even as end-of-life planning gains favor with more Americans, African-Americans, research shows, remain very skeptical of options like hospice and advance directives

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