Bruce Schneier argues that we’ll have to battle both the disease and the fake news

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Secret recordings captured physicians’ concerns that more children seemed to fare poorly after heart surgery. Their hospital kept doing the operations

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The Mixed-Reality Social Prosthesis, based on the skills of so-called human lie detectors, magnifies microexpressions

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He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority. Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?

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Twenty years ago, images of staggering cattle and descriptions of brains resembling Swiss cheese became associated with one of the most popular television programs of the day when Texas Panhandle cattlemen sued “The Oprah Winfrey Show” for defamation under Texas’ “veggie libel law.” They claimed the program’s negative portrayal of their business caused a steep decline of beef prices

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Lynn Black’s mother-in-law, who had lupus and lung cancer, was rushed into a hospital intensive care unit last summer with shortness of breath. As she lay in bed, intubated and unresponsive, a parade of doctors told the family “all good news.”

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Jessica Porten went to a women’s clinic in Sacramento, CA that accepts her Medicaid coverage, to talk about medication options and therapy. Porten admitted to the nurse that she was having some violent thoughts. “I described maybe hitting myself or squeezing the baby too tight,” she said. “But I was very adamant through the entire appointment that I was not going to hurt myself and I was not going to hurt my children.”

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When the Tribeca Film Festival canceled its controversial screening of Vaxxed, a “documentary” (with scare-quotes) alleging a Centers for Disease Control cover-up of the debunked vaccine-autism link, it vindicated what scientists have collectively been saying for years: There’s nothing to talk about here. Vaccines don’t cause autism, and there’s no CDC cover-up, full stop

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