Bill Jenkins, a government epidemiologist who tried to expose the unethical Tuskegee syphilis study in the 1960s and devoted the rest of his career to fighting racism in health care, died on Feb. 17 in Charleston, S.C. He was 73

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Should a college expunge his name?

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‘Ethics Dumping’

December 13, 2017

The dark side of international research. Knowingly inflicting severe harm on human beings for the purpose of research is one of the most serious human rights abuses possible. Cases of exploitation in research have been used to illustrate unacceptable practices since the mid-20th century

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In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service enlisted African-American men in Macon County, Alabama in a syphilis study. The men weren’t asked for informed consent — and were told they would get treatment. They didn’t, even after penicillin was shown to cure syphilis. Host Sheilah Kast discusses what happened and the implications for research today with whistleblower, Peter Buxtun, and our Nancy Kass

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Honors for Racist Scientists

September 7, 2017

As debate over statues and building names moves from Confederate generals to researchers, editorial in Nature receives intense backlash

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It has been 45 years since the nation learned that more than 600 African-American men from rural Alabama were experimented on without their consent, and left untreated in a notorious federally funded syphilis study

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There is no question that the Tuskegee study is one of the most horrific examples of unethical research in recent history. For 40 years, ending in 1972, members of the United States Public Health Service followed African-American men infected with syphilis and didn’t treat them (although they told some men they did) so that they could see the disease take its course

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Our Nancy Kass is a guest editor of the American Journal of Public Health’s comprehensive look at the current ethical landscape of human subjects research with minority populations

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