Dr. Hasan Shanawani was overcome by frustration. So, last week he picked up his cellphone and began sharing on Twitter his family’s enraging experiences with the U.S. health care system

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Big pharma is partnering with influencers to sell new drugs and medical devices

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Even if you aren’t on Twitter. Companies have made billions of dollars by turning everything we say, do, and look at online into an experiment in consumer profiling. Recently, some users have had enough, curtailing their use of social media or deleting their accounts completely. But that’s no guarantee of privacy

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Participants in medical research are more empowered than ever to influence the design and outcomes of experiments. Now, researchers are trying to keep up

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Findings suggest much of the online discussion about vaccines may be linked to ‘malicious actors’ with ‘hidden agendas’

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The advent of social media technology has opened many new avenues of research in population health, demographics, psychology, and the social sciences

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Investigators find many examples of unprofessional, ‘potentially objectionable’ behavior online. The study is not the first to bring attention to doctors’ social media use. The issue has been on the medical profession’s radar for a while, said Dr. Matthew DeCamp, of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore

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Tweet when you vomit. The UK Food Standards Agency has enlisted Twitter to track the spread of the norovirus, based on people tweeting about being ill

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