At any given time, there are about 13,000 people waiting for a liver transplant in the United States. Whether the cause is a virus, alcoholism or a bit of genetic bad luck, they’re all suffering while sick and scarred livers struggle to clean their blood

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What happens if you need a kidney transplant and don’t know a biological match? A Nobel prize-winning economist has a solution: transplant chains. Donors agree to give to a stranger in exchange for a kidney for their loved one, but it has to start with someone willing to give without getting anything in return

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Would you reject one from someone who died of a drug overdose?

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“I sort of feel like we’ve been left in the dark,” says one patient’s wife, who learned from a reporter — and not the Houston hospital — about the program’s temporary suspension. An expert says it will likely take much longer than 14 days to fix

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Baylor St. Luke’s in Houston was known for handling complex heart transplants. But when Travis Hogan was a patient there, he didn’t know that the program was undergoing a series of dramatic changes. He never got his heart

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For more than three decades, the nonprofit United Network for Organ Sharing has run America’s organ transplant system, matching organs with those who need them thanks to a contract with the United States government. This year, the Washington Post reports, at least two groups are exploring a bid against UNOS—the first time the organization has faced a challenge in well over a decade

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50 Years of Success, Strategies for Improvement,

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Ms. Fawcett, 53, has end-stage liver disease, and the celebration took place in a ninth-floor family lounge at Mount Sinai Hospital, though she was too sick to eat very much. Ms. Fawcett, a retired caterer, is one of 14,100 people in the United States waiting for a liver transplant. One in ten will die before getting an organ

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