Attorney General Letitia James of New York said on Thursday that she had filed a lawsuit against a for-profit stem cell clinic, Park Avenue Stem Cell, claiming it performed unproven, rogue procedures on patients with a wide range of medical conditions, from erectile dysfunction to heart disease

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Critics are concerned about the explosion in controversial stem cell procedures offered by clinics—and, increasingly, respected hospitals

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12 patients who tried injections of stem cells were hospitalized with infections, according to a report in The New York Times that should cause patients concern. More important is that they should investigate stem cell treatments, for conditions such as cartilage injuries to their joints, before committing to one of these procedures

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Unproven therapies should not be marketed to patients.

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“It’s confusing. It’s confusing for even people like me who do this day in and day out,” Alison Bateman-House, a bioethicist at New York University who opposed the federal right-to-try law on the grounds that it would give patients false hope and could potentially lead to patient harm

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This briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics examines the ethical issues that can arise when patients and doctors wish to use experimental treatments

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New report identifies unlicensed clinics advertising their services online

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They’re the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments.

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