Among 816 women who stored eggs in 2014, most common reason was lack of male partner, HFEA study finds

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According to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics, the average age of first-time mothers in 2014 was 26.3, up from 24.9 in 2000. The sharpest increases in age have occurred since 2009, when the average was 25.2. But there has been a steady rise over the past four decades: in 1970, the mean age of a first-time mother stood at 21.4

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Prenatal care for incarcerated women. Between 1980 and 2010, the number of women in prison in the United States increased by 646 percent, going from 15,000 women to 113,000. Although accurate statistics are hard to obtain, it’s estimated that 3 to 4 percent of women are pregnant when they arrive at prison

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On Menopause

December 15, 2015

There are a few things science doesn’t know about the menopause: what it’s for, how it works and how best to treat it. Approaching her second – yes, second – menopause, Rose George finds herself with more questions than answers

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If egg freezing once sounded like science fiction, those days are over. Women now hear about it from their friends, their doctors and informational events like Wine and Freeze

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‘These Babies Keep Dying’

November 10, 2015

Prodded by lawsuits, one jail moves to curb fetal deaths

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Aaron Carroll: it will most likely be even harder to change the public’s expectations. For decades, we’ve been told, over and over, that more screening is better, that early detection is the key to a cure. That’s true, up to a point. We seem to have passed that point, though, and more and more experts are trying to reverse course

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The finding is at odds with current recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that women with typical risks for breast cancer have screening mammograms every two years starting at age 50 and until they turn 75

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