Gene-editing technology has accelerated progress on animal organ transplant to the point where scientists will soon begin the first human trials

Quick Read

Japanese scientists said Wednesday they had successfully used mouse stem cells to grow kidneys in rat embryos, using a technique that could one day help grow human kidneys for transplant

Quick Read

More than 116,000 Americans are waiting to receive an organ transplant, and about 20 die each day during the wait. Scientists are eager to find solutions to the organ shortage

Quick Read

In a striking advance that helps open the door to organ transplants from animals, researchers have created gene-edited piglets cleansed of viruses that might cause disease in humans

Quick Read

Scientists in the United States are trying to grow human organs inside pigs. They have injected human stem cells into pig embryos to produce human-pig embryos known as chimeras. The embryos are part of research aimed at overcoming the worldwide shortage of transplant organs

Quick Read

The NIH should get on board. Hank Greely writes in an op-ed, ” Thirty years ago Paul Simon immortalized one of the first animal-human transplants with the lyrics, “These are the days of miracle and wonder.… Medicine is magical and magical is art. Thinking of the boy in the bubble and the baby with the baboon heart.”

Quick Read

Despite their slovenly habits in agricultural settings, pigs raised in biomedical labs are clean enough that many humans would welcome —indeed, do welcome — the use of their tissue for life-saving transplants. Transplanted heart valves routinely come from pigs as well as cows

Quick Read