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The Trump administration pledged Wednesday to reduce end stage kidney disease by 25 percent by 2030, proposing to provide better care earlier in the disease’s progression and double the number of kidney transplants performed in the United States.

President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday morning that is also designed to move many of the more than 500,000 people receiving kidney dialysis away from commercial centers to less expensive in-home care.

Trump said the order delivers “ground-breaking action to millions of Americans suffering from kidney disease. It’s a big deal.”

In a briefing for reporters before Trump’s speech, Joe Grogan, head of the White House Domestic Policy Council, described the package of initiatives as the biggest improvement in kidney care since the government extended coverage of kidney failure under Medicare in 1973.

Medicare spends more than $110 billion on kidney care, about 20 percent of all fee-for-service dollars paid out by the giant government health insurance program.

“The focus has been on paying for procedures rather than paying for good outcomes,” Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar said in the telephone briefing. “Under the president’s leadership, we’re going to flip that around.”

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The Washington Post

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