It’s worth noting that Medicaid expansion helps pay for opioid addiction treatment, said Brendan Saloner of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Medicaid expansion covers costs treatments like detoxification, outpatient treatment, and treatment for masked health conditions

Quick Read

For some, progress cannot come soon enough. Running short on time, dying cancer patients are concocting do-it-yourself versions of highly experimental cancer therapies, without the oversight of doctors or regulators

Quick Read

Repeated blood draws during a hospital stay can have a negative impact on a patient’s health and contribute to rising health care costs. In a review article published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, physicians at Johns Hopkins joined an international team that crafted an improvement blueprint to reduce repetitive lab testing for hospitalized patients

Quick Read

Have you ever wondered why your computer often shows you ads that seem tailor-made for your interests? The answer is big data. By combing through extremely large datasets, analysts can reveal patterns in your behavior

Quick Read

A federal judge on Wednesday ordered top United States government officials to allow a pregnant 17-year-old immigrant to get an abortion — the first ruling in a case that could eventually grow to include hundreds of other undocumented minors who seek access to an abortion while in federal custody

Quick Read

The promise of gene therapy has the potential to drastically limit the impact of human disease by altering the make-up of the body’s cells to fight back against deadly invaders. If used recreationally, though, gene therapy could also expand the physical limits of human strength and endurance. Like high-tech steroids, gene therapies could one day be a new way for athletes to dope

Quick Read

The Ethics Working Group on ZIKV Research and Pregnancy has authored a new publication in Vaccine, summarizing their recommendations for the Zika virus vaccine research agenda.

Read More

Dorothy R. Novick: Patients refuse care based on health-care providers’ ethnicity and religion so often that this phenomenon has been dubbed “medicine’s open secret.”

Quick Read