Should diagnoses be crafted to clarify their use as criminal charges?

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The issues surrounding GMOs have never been simple. They became more complicated last week when an international agency declared that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used herbicide Roundup, probably causes cancer in humans. Two insecticides, malathion and diazinon, were also classified as “probable” carcinogens by the agency, a respected arm of the WHO

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Patricia Davidson, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, said,”In Wall Street or Silicon Valley people can dismiss it because it’s a culture that’s not known to be accommodating – a male-dominated work environment where it’s stacked against them – but when you see this inequity in nursing it speaks to a larger problem.”

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Infections of the Mind

March 25, 2015

why anti-vaxxers just ‘know’ they’re right. Thom Scott-Phillips: Anti-vaccination beliefs can cause real, substantive harm, as shown by the recent outbreak of measles in the US. These developments are as shocking and distressing as their consequences are predictable. But if the consequences are so predictable, why do the beliefs persist?

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Over the objections of the medical community, state Rep. Stuart Spitzer, R-Kaufman, has filed a bill that would prohibit doctors from asking patients whether they own a firearm and makes the Texas Medical Board, which licenses physicians, responsible for doling out punishment

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A report found that just 45 percent of Medicare patients who’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s said they were informed of the diagnosis by their doctor. By contrast, more than 90 percent of Medicare patients with cancer said they were told by their doctor

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Physician incentives are needed to improve end of life care in the U.S., health experts said Friday at an Institute of Medicine (IOM) forum

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TWO years ago I wrote about my choice to have a preventive double mastectomy. A simple blood test had revealed that I carried a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. It gave me an estimated 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer. I lost my mother, grandmother and aunt to cancer

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