“Sooner or later you get to the point — in theory you get to the point — where all the [polio] cases in the world are caused by the vaccine,” Philip Minor, the head of virology at National Institute for Biological Standards and Control in the United Kingdom, tells me. “So you are basically using the vaccine to protect against the vaccine. And that is just ludicrous, isn’t it?”

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Gut Microbes

January 8, 2016

The latest experiment in enhancing athletic performance. “If we can determine what the ideal composition of microorganisms within the intestinal tract is for [the] Japanese based on their diet, it could help improve the performance of athletes”

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Leading experts debate the role that science—and politics—played in the new 2015 Dietary Guidelines

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For over four years, scientists have been arguing over whether or not to do experiments that could make more dangerous forms of certain viruses — influenza, SARS, or MERS — that could potentially start a pandemic in people if those creations got out of the lab

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In an interview by Katrien Devolder, Julian Savulescu (Oxford) argues that doctors should not impose their religious or non-religious values on patients if this conflicts with the delivery of basic public healthcare

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An analysis recently published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ) is not a condemnation of cancer screening itself. It’s more a condemnation of how we present cancer screening

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The Ethics of Moral Outrage

January 7, 2016

As Cynda Rushton has stated, we “should distinguish between moral outrage that is grounded in principled discernment and action from an impulsive, unreflected emotional reaction that lacks sufficient grounding in ethical values or standards.” Such an approach would go a long way toward recognizing true moral outrage and be more discerning and disciplined about our responses to it

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Strong genomics record bodes well but a shortage of doctors could pose a hurdle

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