By the time Kay Schwister got her diagnosis last summer, she couldn’t talk anymore. But she could still scowl, and scowl she did. After weeks of decline and no clue what was causing it, doctors had told Schwister — a 53-year-old vocational rehab counselor and mother of two from Chicago — that she had an incurable disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD

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A Dangerous Wait

February 6, 2017

Colleges can’t meet soaring student needs for mental health care. STAT surveyed dozens of universities about their mental health services. From major public institutions to small elite colleges, a striking pattern emerged: Students often have to wait weeks just for an initial intake exam to review their symptoms. The wait to see a psychiatrist who can prescribe or adjust medication — often a part-time employee — may be longer still

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President Trump’s vow to overhaul the Food and Drug Administration could bring major changes in policy, including steps to accelerate the process of approving new prescription drugs, setting up a clash with critics who say his push for deregulation might put consumers at risk

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How can nurses show resilience in the face of moral distress? In August 2016, 45 nurse leaders, clinicians, researchers, ethicists, and key stakeholders convened to discuss that very question in a Symposium

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On January 27, Germany’s Bundestag commemorated the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the inmates of Auschwitz concentration camp. This year the focus was placed on the 300,000 disabled victims of the notorious Aktion T-4 euthanasia program

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As we know by now, history often repeats itself. History, that is, which involves outlandish price hikes by pharmaceutical companies

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For decades, hospital intensive-care units focused on facilitating the care provided by doctors and nurses to the gravely ill, while access was limited for patients’ families, partly so they wouldn’t get in the way. That’s beginning to change under a new approach known in medical circles as “family-centered care” that’s gaining traction in ICUs as hospitals look for ways to improve care and cut costs. With comments from our Renee Boss

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The bodies just keep arriving. On Thursday, only two days into February, the coroner’s office in Dayton, Ohio, had already handled 25 deaths — 18 caused by drug overdoses. In January, the office processed 145 cases in which the victims’ bodies had been destroyed by opioids

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