In late 2012, Agnes Binagwaho, Rwanda’s Minister of Health, realized her country’s key health enemy was something far more innocuous. The thing causing the most harm to her people, the leading risk factor for premature death and disability, was inside their own homes: Dirty indoor air, from cooking food over burning dung and vegetation in poorly ventilated huts

Quick Read

To hear Oliver Sacks tell it, writing books for a mass audience was once considered one of the worst things a doctor could do

Quick Read

Orin Levine: If you have used the Tube in London, you are likely familiar with the voice from above reminding you to “mind the gap.” Alert to the danger of not paying attention, you heed this warning for your personal safety. There is another gap that threatens the safety of millions of children in the world’s poorest countries: the disparity among children regarding their access to lifesaving vaccines

Quick Read

The first hijacking of a medical telerobot raises important questions over the security of remote surgery, say computer security experts

Quick Read

For decades, first-year medical students have had to cram the details of the Krebs cycle into their heads. Now the biomedical model of educating doctors, based largely on a century-old document called The Flexner Report, is coming under fire

Quick Read

The New York State attorney general, Eric T. Schneiderman, filed lawsuits against two popular indoor tanning salon chains on Thursday, accusing them of playing down the hazards associated with indoor tanning and promoting the practice as a healthful activity

Quick Read

A Q&A with our Leonard Rubenstein about physicians, pharmaceutical companies, and the constitutionality of death penalty protocols

Read More

Restructure data-gathering and evaluation networks to address climate change, energy, food, health and water provision, say Yonglong Lu and colleagues

Quick Read