Many studies that link global warming to civil unrest are biased and exacerbate stigma about the developing world

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California voters passed a law two years ago that allows terminally ill people to take lethal drugs to end their lives, but controversy is growing over a newer rule that effectively bans that option in the state’s eight veterans homes

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First, make sure the FDA stays involved

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Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an HIV-positive patient for surgery. Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-HIV drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting HIV through sex

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb isn’t rolling back his agency’s mission, although he is straddling the interests of the drug and health industries along with public health

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Lynn Black’s mother-in-law, who had lupus and lung cancer, was rushed into a hospital intensive care unit last summer with shortness of breath. As she lay in bed, intubated and unresponsive, a parade of doctors told the family “all good news.”

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“Can I get it?” His tiny hands are outstretched, his feet firmly planted in the Target toy aisle. He is holding up another Lego set. Rowan is 6 years old, and his admiration for Lego building blocks is unending

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As in all industries, there are networks, known as supply chains, consisting of suppliers, processors and distributors, that get a product – in this case blood – to the health care providers for the patients in need. But the blood supply chain is not your typical supply chain

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