The source they really trust with questions about health? Surprise: their parents. The new report, “Teens, Health and Technology,” is an expansive look at how teenagers use technology to learn about health by researchers at Northwestern University. The findings are based on a nationally representative sample of 1,156 adolescents aged 13 to 18

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California Dying

June 2, 2015

Gerald Dworkin: I am finishing the six months a year that I live in California. While here I have been working on the campaign, led by an organization called Compassion and Choices, to get a bill passed by the California legislature–SB128. This is a bill to allow medically-assisted dying in the state of California

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Some hospitals require their workers to get flu shots, which is controversial among those who can’t or don’t want to get vaccines. Beyond that, there are questions about money. For example, is a big financial penalty for nonparticipation too coercive? What about incentives for completing health screenings?

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During a recent physical, Jeff Gordon’s doctor told him he may be pre-diabetic. It was a quick mention, mixed in with a review of blood pressure numbers, other vital statistics like his heart rate, height and weight, and details about his prescription for cholesterol medication. Normally, Gordon, 70, a food broker who lives in Washington, D.C., would have paid it little attention

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Doctors call it defensive medicine. They order extra tests, perform extra procedures or push for more office visits because they think that without them, they’re at greater risk of being sued. But studies don’t support the notion that this reduces their risk. What might help physicians avoid being sued is getting along better with their patients. Or at least, they could become better communicators

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Most hiring committees and tenure review boards in the social sciences continue to give more weight to publications or the potential to publish in top technical journals above other factors when making decisions that affect the careers of young academics. But popular media attention increasingly works in a candidate’s favor as well. For tenure decisions

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A Q&A with our Cynda Hylton Rushton about a new policy that aims to prevent and resolve treatment disputes in the intensive care unit

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A company’s use of DNA tests to investigate employee wrongdoing ran afoul of a genetic nondiscrimination act

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