Community consultation is the only way to study issues in emergency medicine. “If you require consent for all clinical studies you end up getting into a Catch-22 where you can never systematically learn about anything in an emergency setting,” said Nancy Kass, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. “A person having a heart attack cannot give consent.”

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The U.K. might become the first nation to allow in-vitro fertilization using DNA from three people. Our Dr. Margaret Moon speaks with WSJ’s Tanya Rivero about the ethical implications

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All new fertility methods sound crazy at first. Yet it’s important to understand that mitochondrial replacement isn’t genetic engineering run amok, cautions Debra Mathews of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. “No one is messing directly with genes,” she says. “Scientists are replacing damaged mitochondria with healthy mitochondria.”

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The ongoing measles outbreak linked to Disneyland has led to some harsh comments about parents who don’t vaccinate their kids. But Juniper Russo, a writer in Chattanooga, Tenn., says she understands those parents because she used to be one of them

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A group of patients and doctors are filing a lawsuit Wednesday asking New York courts to rule that medically-assisted suicide is legal in the state

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The health law brought regulations to limit for the first time the cost-sharing in plans. An individual plan sold on an exchange can’t include out-of-pocket costs greater than $6,600. But the regulation still only applies to providers and specialists specified by the plan as “in-network.”

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So has dying in America gotten any less painful? Despite efforts to build hospice and palliative care programs across the country, the answer seems to be a resounding no

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How close are we to preventing the inheritance of mitochondrial disorders?

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