What happened in the 1951 case of Henrietta Lacks, and could it happen again today? The story of the woman who unwittingly spurred a scientific bonanza made for a best-selling book in 2010. On Saturday, it returns in an HBO film with Oprah Winfrey portraying Lacks’ daughter Deborah. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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Johns Hopkins leaders sent a message to the JHU and Hopkins Medicine communities today about an upcoming HBO film, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The film is based on the best-selling book about the life of a woman who was treated for cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s

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As doctors and health professionals take to public spaces like Twitter and Facebook to curate and create we face new challenges. One of the challenges is how to disclose our relationship to the organizations and products. How do we disclose conflict of interest in so many different kinds of venues?

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She had visited Madonna’s mansion the week before, Maggie told me during my ward round. Helped her choose outfits for the tour. The only problem was that Maggie was a seamstress in Dublin. She had never met Madonna; she had never provided her with sartorial advice on cone brassieres

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It’s a nightmare scenario straight out of a primetime drama: a child-seeking couple visits a fertility clinic to try their luck with in-vitro fertilization, only to wind up accidentally impregnated by the wrong sperm

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A Q&A with Becky McLaren about her work on our Timor-Leste Strategic Review Project

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Our former Greenwall Fellow, Jonathan Marks, delivers a TED talk that challenges this conventional wisdom, showing how governments can jeopardize public health, human rights and the environment when they partner with industry

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Investigators find many examples of unprofessional, ‘potentially objectionable’ behavior online. The study is not the first to bring attention to doctors’ social media use. The issue has been on the medical profession’s radar for a while, said Dr. Matthew DeCamp, of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore

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